I learned Spanish entirely on my own, online, and I'll show you how you can, too!
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Best Spanish Dictionary and Verb Conjugator

best online Spanish dictionary and verb conjugatorJust a quick short post here that I suspect will save a lot of you guys some time googling around and trying to find a Spanish dictionary and online verb conjugator that your like–I’ve tried a bunch of them, I’ve used Google Translate (too simple, often has just one word definitions, that’s just not enough), Word Reference (ok, but the interface is a bit difficult to use compared to what I’m currently using), Merriam-Webster, etc. etc.

My personal favorite online Spanish dictionary AND translator (they’ve got both right there, one right under the other, so you can look up a single word or translate a whole sentence or paragraph on the same page) is SpanishDict.com–easy to use and their definitions are the best I’ve seen yet, plus they offer three different translations (one from Google, one from Babelfish, and one from FreeTranslation), and the translator has a button for Spanish to English and right next to it a button for English to Spanish, so again, no need to navigate away, mess around with drop-down menus and selecting the right settings, etc. Super, super easy and very fast to use.

My favorite verb conjugator is Verbix: you type in the word you want conjugated, you hit enter, you are shown a full table, logically organized and easy to read, of the entire conjugation of the verb you just entered.  That’s it. Beautiful simplicity.  SpanishDict also has a verb conjugator, and it’s a toss-up which one is better because it roughly does the same thing in the same way, I just thought I’d throw in a couple options there so you can look at both and decide based on your own personal preferences (I must admit I think the SpanishDict one is a bit prettier).

A quick note before we finish up: if you’re interested in teaching yourself Spanish…

I have a short post and video (that are free to read and view of course, won’t cost you more than a few minutes of your time) on how to do precisely that with the system that I put together which allowed me to become fluent in Spanish in just 6 months after years of trial-and-error by watching Spanish-language TV shows (like telenovelas, hence the name of the system) and movies, reading Spanish books and comics, and listening to Spanish music. If this sounds interesting to you, check it out by clicking the link below (the following link should open in a new tab or window for you when you click it so I’m not asking you to leave this article here):

“The Telenovela Method of Learning Spanish” (a “telenovela” is a Spanish-language soap opera, they’re what I initially used to teach myself Spanish!)

I also include some quick and valuable tips for learning Spanish as well as a couple of the most useful free Spanish-learning websites that I recommend.

Cheers,

Andrew

 

Get my list of the internet's top 33 FREE Spanish-learning resources here!

I put together a list of the internet’s Top 33 Free Spanish-learning resources, my favorite language exchanges and Spanish chat rooms, and more. I’ve spent a great deal of time putting together a 3-part series of articles for you on the internet’s best free resources for the Spanish-learner that you’ll get when you sign up for my newsletter–in addition to all of what you get below, I’ll be sure to send you any updates about cool new sites, resources, and learning tips and techniques that I come up with (I’m currently putting together a whole series that will teach you in great detail precisely how I go about learning a new language):

Part 1: A very long list of my favorite Top 33 free online Spanish-learning resources (tools, references, sites with free lessons, articles, blogs, forums, etc.) that’s far too long to include here, especially with all the other stuff I’ve got here that’s available just on this site alone, and I’d like to offer it to you (completely free, you don’t have to do anything other than sign up) right now.

Part 2: I explain what language exchanges are (essentially they allow you free access to an unlimited number of native speakers to practice your Spanish with), why they’re absolutely essential if you’re teaching yourself (I’m serious when I say this: it’s impossible to get fluent without them if you’re learning a foreign language on your own), how to use them, and which ones are the best.

Part 3: I cover chat rooms which are specifically devoted to connecting you with native Spanish speakers who want to learn English so you can chat with them in Spanish (and they’ll help and correct you) and then you do the same for them with their English (these are completely free to use, but rather hard to find, but I’ll tell you where the best ones are!). Sign up below!

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  • I’m partial to wordreference.com, both for my near-native French and my low-intermediate Spanish. What I especially like about it are the forums where native speakers weigh in on how the words are actually used in real life. I have learned a lot, for example, about now-obscure words used in traditional French nursery rhymes.

    Thanks for listing me on your blogroll and for dropping by my blog. Please come back any time; I look forward to hearing your comments! Good luck on your language-learning quest.

    • admin

      Ahhhh!! My first comment ever! Yay! You rock, Sarah 😀

      You run an excellent site with good, solid content, that’s why you’re on the blogroll. You’re welcome, keep up the good work.

      I agree with you on the WordReference forums, I’ve used them before myself (been awhile, I should probably get back on there, they are good forums) so I do agree that having the forums on hand so that you can get a native speaker’s take on a word or translation is something no automated dictionary or translator could do.

      Cheers,
      Andrew

  • I’m partial to wordreference.com, both for my near-native French and my low-intermediate Spanish. What I especially like about it are the forums where native speakers weigh in on how the words are actually used in real life. I have learned a lot, for example, about now-obscure words used in traditional French nursery rhymes.

    Thanks for listing me on your blogroll and for dropping by my blog. Please come back any time; I look forward to hearing your comments! Good luck on your language-learning quest.

    • admin

      Ahhhh!! My first comment ever! Yay! You rock, Sarah 😀

      You run an excellent site with good, solid content, that’s why you’re on the blogroll. You’re welcome, keep up the good work.

      I agree with you on the WordReference forums, I’ve used them before myself (been awhile, I should probably get back on there, they are good forums) so I do agree that having the forums on hand so that you can get a native speaker’s take on a word or translation is something no automated dictionary or translator could do.

      Cheers,
      Andrew